Restore – not-for-profit educational corporation

RESTORE is a national not-for-profit educational corporation which offers a range of programs and services related to the technology of building conservation. Since 1976, RESTORE has provided workshops and courses on the technology of architectural preservation to building industry professionals who are directly responsible for the preservation of our architectural heritage. RESTORE students include a cross section of architects, engineers, craftworkers, contractors, cultural resource managers, architectural conservators and preservationists, as well as others active in the field of building preservation. The RESTORE faculty consists of a team of nationally and internationally renown architectural conservators, architects, engineers, chemists, geologists, material scientists and industrial hygienist. All are actively engaged in architectural preservation. All RESTORE curricula have been reviewed by the Professional Development Committee of the A! merica n Institute of Architects and are eligible for AIA Continuing Education Learning Units. RESTORE is a not-for-profit educational corporation licensed by the Board of Regents of the University of New York State

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Charter for the Conservation

Paintings created by man constitute an important and impressive component of heritage. This creative art is always placed on a support and therefore, the preservation of the painted heritage constitute both the conservation of the supported fabric or edifice, and also the pigmented layer as well…

CALL FOR PAPERS | The 7th US/ICOMOS International Symposium

Since the adoption of the World Heritage Convention in 1972, consensus on its criteria and operational guidelines has been shaped by a rich international discussion strongly influenced by the heritage policies of its 176state parties, including the United States. Reciprocally, World Heritage policies and principles have returned home to every country to refine and enhance each nations’ ability to address the complexity of its cultural and national heritage.

Course on Conservation of Built Heritage 2010 (CBH10)

Dates: 5 March – 30 April 2010, Place: Rome, Italy, ICCROM is pleased to announce the third training course on Conservation of Built Heritage in Rome. ICCROM has been a pioneer in organizing courses in heritage conservation since 1965 including the Architectural Conservation Course (ARC) and many other regular courses and long term programmes.

Koguryo was Korean ancient state from BC 37 to AD 668.

We Koreans are deeply concerned about China’s bid to put Koguryo ruins including tomb murals in its territory on the World Heritage List since we have reasonable doubts on China’s political intention for the bid. We do not oppose the historical value of the remains or the application itself. We were so disappointed when North Korea’s bid for its Koguryo tomb murals in North Korea was put on hold in the 27th session of the World Heritage Committee by Chinese objection. Just a few years later, China is pushing its own bid on the similar Koguryo burial sites and murals in northeastern Chinese border cities. We can hardly believe that China has no other designs beyond the preservation and protection of the historic sites, which both North and South Koreans regard as their spiritual symbol as well as the origin of national identity.